Table 1

Comparative data of the sample in the EPISER study and of the Spanish general population

Variable Frequency Population1-150
Women1178  (53.7%)51.12%
Age group (>20)
 20–29463 (21.1%)20.8%
 30–39439 (20.0%)20.3%
 40–49371 (16.9%)17.0%
 50–59326 (14.9%)14.3%
 60–69313 (14.3%)12.7%
 70–79205 (9.4%)10.0%
 ⩾80 75 (3.4%)4.8%
Living in cities1584 (72.3%)74.0%
Study level
 No formal education271 (12.4%)14.8%
 Elementary953 (43.7%)45.9%
 High school398 (18.2%)15.5%
 College560 (25.6%)20.9%
Type of job
 Agriculture193 (12.0%)8.4%
 Industry344 (21.4%)20.2%
 Construction107 (6.7%)9.7%
 Services964 (60.0%)61.7%
Social class1-151
 Low588 (26.8%)No comparable data
 Medium778 (35.5%)
 High237 (10.8%)
 Unspecified589 (26.9%)
Employment status
 Employed1132 (51.6%)41.8%
 Unemployed74 (3.4%)9.0%1-152
 Student107 (4.9%)5.1%1-153
 Retired483 (22.0%)Undetermined
 Housewives60 (2.7%)Undetermined
 Disabled107 (4.9%)(4.6%)
 Others or unspecified15 (0.7%)Undetermined
  • 1-150 Data from the Institute of National Statistics, 1999 or 1997, depending on last data available.11

  • 1-151 Social class was assigned depending on the profession of the respondent according to the protocol of the Spanish Society of Epidemiology.12

  • 1-152 Much of the difference could be explained by the fact that many of the people studying in Spain sign up at the employment offices as “unemployed”, while in the EPISER study students were not permitted to define themselves as “unemployed”.

  • 1-153 Obtained by dividing the total number of students registered at universities and professional colleges by the number of persons over 20.