eLetters

131 e-Letters

published between 2005 and 2008

  • Bifid median nerve is not uncommon condition
    Mahamoud M Gabal

    Dear Editor, 1977 was the year in which U Lanz described 4 median nerve variants. All of them could be detected by ultrasonography. As this classification was surgical dependent it did not represent the real distribution of the variants in the community. Bifid median nerve was 2.8% only. This percent is not coping with our practical or research findings. As a radiologist interested in this new field of neurosonography the m...

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  • Real role of ultrasonography in detection of nerve abnormality in CTS
    Mahamoud M Gabal

    Dear Editor

    The role of sonography in rheumatology has been increased in the last decade. The frequent question is [can US simulate other investigatory methods in this branch], for example can US simulate the nerve conduction studies in detection of nerve abnormalities? The research directed to answer this question is limited and misses the fact that the ultrasonography has two components, the static and dynamic compo...

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  • NSAIDS and ESR in the onset of heart failure in rheumatoid arthritis
    David J Armstrong

    Dear Editor,

    Maradit-Kremers and colleagues raise several important issues in their excellent paper on heart failure in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (1), but at least two important questions as well. Although, as they point out, there have been previous links suggested between ESR and heart failure (2) many other factors can interfere with ESR. C-reactive protein (CRP), a much 'cleaner' measure of inflammation, and is...

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  • Aspirin versus acetaminophen for pain control in patients with cardiovascular risk
    Michal R. Pijak

    Dear Editor,

    I read with great interest the recently published EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis.(1) However, I would like to add a few words of comment regarding the use of analgesicsin patients with cardiovascular (CV) and gastrointestinal (GI) risk factors. In my opinion the rational choice for such patients is the use ofaspirin combined with a proton-pump inhibitor.

    First...

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  • Tumour necrosis factor alpha antagonist-induced psoriasis: A mystery
    Jean-David Cohen

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the editorial of Ritchlin and Tausk1 about psoriasiform lesions developed in patients receiving tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α antagonists. We would like to provide additional information. Indeed, we have recently reported 6 cases of psoriasiform lesions during TNFα antagonist therapy and described common characteristics of this paradoxical reaction with 40 cases already pu...

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  • Smoking may reduce DHEA and cartilage maintenance
    James M. Howard

    Dear Editor

    It is my hypothesis that most drugs of addiction activate DHEA release. When DHEA declines following drug activation of DHEA, the drug is again used to reactivate DHEA. This may be the basis of addiction. Smoking has been demonstrated to activate DHEA release (Neuropsychopharmacology. 2005 Sep;30(9):1751-63).

    DHEA, estradiol, and testosterone have been found to "stimulate articular cartilag...

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  • On the Prevention of Tuberculosis in Patients Treated with anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor α agents
    Susana Casas

    Dear Sir,

    As the use of anti-tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNFα) treatment has grown, the increasing incidence of associated infectious complications, particularly tuberculosis, has emerged as the therapy’s main drawback.[1] Currently, screening for tuberculosis prior to initiation of treatment with anti-TNFα agents relies on clinical and radiographic assessment and the tuberculin skin test (TST).[2] In case of...

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  • Ultrasonographic bone changes are really two stages {types}
    Mahamoud M Gabal

    Dear Editor, I read with interest this work. Indeed ultrasonography has increasing role in this field so the interpretation of its images is so important for the rheumatologist. From a radiological and pathological point of view we can divide the changes of the bone in this disease into two types. Type one, which is the pre-erosive stage appears as many hyperechoic bone islands in the ostoid tissue of the cortical and en...

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  • Predictors of disability in valued life activities in Rheumatoid arthritis
    Meenakshi Jolly

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the article by Katz et al on the prevalence and predictors of disability in valued life activities among individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (1).

    It is encouraging that patient based assessments are being explored among rheumatic diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) have received the most attention in this regard. It is thus reassuring that...

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  • Sublinical muscle damage in dermatomyositis
    Daniele Torchia

    Dear Editor,

    Dorph et al. provided new additional data on muscle inflammation on polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). [1] In particular, the Authors found that symptomatic and asymptomatic muscles featured similar histopathologic changes, numbers of T cells, macrophages, expression of IL -1[alfa] in endothelial cells and expression of MHC-I and -II on muscle fibres. The Authors conclude that "the inflammator...

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