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Genetic predisposition (HLA-SE) is associated with ACPA-IgG variable domain glycosylation in the predisease phase of RA

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Footnotes

  • Handling editor Josef S Smolen

  • TK and TJvW contributed equally.

  • Contributors TK: study concept and design, conducting experiments, aquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of the results, drafting and revising the manuscript, final approval of the manuscript. TJvW: study concept and design, statistical data analysis and interpretation of the results, drafting and revising the manuscript, final approval of the manuscript. AL and HK: statistical data analysis and interpretation of the results, critical revision and final approval of the manuscript. AK, MT, DvS, MW, TWJH and HUS: study concept and design, interpretation of the results, critical revision and final approval of the manuscript. DvdW, SR-D and REMT: study concept and design, interpretation of the results, drafting and revising the manuscript critically, final approval of the manuscript.

  • Funding This work has been financially supported by ReumaNederland (17-1-402 and 08-1-34), the IMI funded project RTCure (777357), ZonMw TOP (91214031) and by Target to B! (LSHM18055-5GF). REMT is a recipient of a European Research Council advanced grant (AdG2019-884796). The work has been further funded by the Swedish Research Council (VR Dnr: 2018–02551), the King Gustaf V’s 80 Year Fund, the King Gustaf V’s and Queen Victoria’s Fund and the Swedish Rheumatism Association.

  • Competing interests HUS, TWJH and REMT are mentioned inventors on a patent on ACPA-IgG V-domain glycosylation.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.