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Autoantibody profiling in patients with very early rheumatoid arthritis - a follow-up study
  1. Valerie Nell-Duxneuner (valerienell{at}yahoo.com)
  1. Medical University of Vienna, Austria
    1. Klaus Machold (klaus.machold{at}meduniwien.ac.at)
    1. Medical University of Vienna, Austria
      1. Tanja Stamm (tanja.stamm{at}meduniwien.ac.at)
      1. Medical University of Vienna, Austria
        1. Gabriele Eberl (gabriele.eberl{at}wienkav.at)
        1. Hietzing Hospital, Austria
          1. Harald Heinzl (harald.heinzl{at}meduniwien.ac.at)
          1. Medical University of Vienna, Austria
            1. Elisabeth Hoefler (elisabeth.hoefler{at}wienkav.at)
            1. Hietzing Hospital, Austria
              1. Josef S Smolen (josef.smolen{at}wienkav.at)
              1. Medical University of Vienna, Austria
                1. Guenter Steiner (guenter.steiner{at}meduniwien.ac.at)
                1. Medical University of Vienna, Austria

                  Abstract

                  Objective: To investigate time courses of autoantibody profiles in patients with early arthritis.

                  Patients and methods: Two hundred patients with very early arthritis (<3 months duration), among them 102 patients with a final diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 98 with other rheumatic diseases, were followed up for several years. First follow-up testing was done in all patients (mean 5 months from baseline), and 82 RA and 35 non-RA patients were available for last follow-up testing (mean 32 months from baseline). IgM-rheumatoid factor (RF) was measured by nephelometry, IgA-RF, IgG-RF and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) by ELISA, and anti-RA33 antibodies were determined by immunoblotting.

                  Results: At baseline, IgA-RF was detectable in 29% and IgG-RF in 14% of RA patients while IgM-RF>50 IU/ml (RF50) was positive in 45% of the patients; specificities were 97%, 99% and 96%, respectively. However, the vast majority of IgA- or IgG-RF positive patients were also positive for RF50 or ACPA. During follow-up prevalence of ACPA slightly increased while prevalence of all RF subtypes and anti-RA33 decreased. Remarkably, the number of patients positive for RF50 and/or ACPA remained constant; and these patients had a highly increased risk for developing erosive disease, in contrast to patients solely positive for anti-RA33.

                  Conclusions: Testing for RF subtypes did not provide additional diagnostic information. Patients positive for RF50 and/or ACPA had an unfavourable prognosis, irrespectively of changes in the antibody profile during follow-up, whereas anti-RA33 positivity was inversely associated with erosiveness both at baseline and at later time points.

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