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SAT0535 Impact of the metabolic syndrome on the prevalence, severity incidence and progression of knee osteoarthritis
  1. N Oreiro-Villar1,2,
  2. M Fernandez-Moreno1,2,
  3. E Cortes-Pereira1,
  4. ME Vazquez-Mosquera1,
  5. S Relaño1,
  6. S Pertega3,
  7. C Fernandez-Lopez1,
  8. FJ Blanco1,
  9. I Rego-Perez1
  1. 1Servicio de Reumatología, Instituto de Investigaciόn Biomédica de A Coruña (INIBIC). Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de A Coruña (CHUAC), Sergas. Universidade da Coruña (UDC). As Xubias, 15006, A Coruña
  2. 2Centro de Investigaciόn Biomédica En Red, Ciber-Bbn, Madrid
  3. 3Unidad de Epidemiología Clínica y Bioestadística, Instituto de Investigaciόn Biomédica de A Coruña (INIBIC). Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de A Coruña (CHUAC), Sergas. Universidade da Coruña (UDC). As Xubias, 15006, A Coruña, Spain

Abstract

Background The contribution of metabolic factors on the development of OA has not been fully elucidated.

Objectives The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of metabolic syndrome in the rate of radiographic incidence and progression of knee osteoarthritis, as well as its impact on the prevalence and severity of the disease.

Methods For this work we used data from the Spanish cohort PROCOAC (PROgnostic Cohort of OsteoArthritis A Coruña). This cohort consists of subjects that visited the Rheumatology consultations at different time points and comprises 984 subjects at baseline including radiographic knee and hip KL grade, radiographic hand OA status, demographic and clinical data as well as the necessary information to assess the metabolic syndrome at baseline, that is, abdominal circumference (in cm) in addition to at least two of the following parameters: triglycerides above 200mg/dL, low HDL (<35 mg/dL), hypertension and increased glucose blood levels (>110 mg/dL). To assess the severity of the disease, the number of affected joints was coded as 0–1 and 2–3, according to the radiographic information of hands, knees and hips. Appropriate statistical analyses including Cox regression models with Kaplan-Meier survival curves and chi-square contingency tables were performed with SPSS v19.

Results The mean age of subjects was 63,86 [32–88] years; 75,6,% were women. A total of 85% had radiographic hand OA and 11,8% suffered metabolic syndrome at baseline. In those OA patients that experienced radiographic knee OA progression over time (any KL increase from KL≥2 at baseline) the metabolic syndrome appeared as a significant risk factor (HR=3.696;95CI:1.085–14.520;p-value=0.037) (Figure 1). Similarly, in those subjects that developed incident radiographic knee OA over time (a new-onset KL grade 2), the metabolic syndrome at baseline also appeared as a significant risk factor with an increased magnitude (HR=12.931;95CI:3.037–55.051;p-value<0.001) (Figure 1). In addition, to have contralateral knee OA at baseline (HR=12.837;95CI:5.044 – 32.673;p-value <0.001) as well as radiographic hand OA (HR=5.671;95CI:0.854–37.649;p-value=0.07) associates with an increased rate of incident knee OA too.

In terms of prevalence and severity of the disease, the metabolic syndrome associates with an increased risk of knee OA (OR=1.865;95% CI=1.080–3.220;p=0.024) as well as with increased number of affected joints, though in a non-significant manner (OR=1.582;95% CI=0.916–2.733;p=0.098)

Conclusions The alterations that underlie the metabolic syndrome condition the severity and prevalence of knee osteoarthritis, as well as the rate of incidence and progression of the disease

Disclosure of Interest None declared

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