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FRI0711 Discordance of the framingham cardiovascular risk score and the 2013 american college of cardiology/american heart association risk score in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis
  1. K Jafri1,
  2. A Ogdie2,
  3. P Katz1,
  4. J Yazdany1,
  5. G Schmajuk1,3
  1. 1Rheumatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco
  2. 2Rheumatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
  3. 3Rheumatology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, United States

Abstract

Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease, and multipliers to traditional 10-year CV risk scores, such as a EULAR-recommended 1.5 multiplier in RA, have been proposed to capture this increased CV risk. The discordance between CV risk assessment by the Framingham risk score, a modified Framingham risk score (with a 1.5 multiplier), and the more recent 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) risk score has not been well-studied in patients with rheumatic diseases.

Objectives To determine the proportion of discordant 10-year Framingham risk scores and 2013 ACC/AHA risk scores in subjects with SLE and RA, both with and without a 1.5 multiplier to the Framingham risk score, and to assess demographic, CV, and rheumatologic clinical characteristics associated with discordant risk scores.

Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using SLE and RA subjects drawn from the University of California, San Francisco, Arthritis, Body Composition, and Disability project. 10-year Framingham risk scores, modified Framingham risk scores (with a 1.5 multiplier), and 2013 ACC/AHA risk scores were calculated. As per Adult Treatment Panel-III (ATP-III) recommendations, a subject with a Framingham risk score (or modified Framingham risk score)≥10% was defined as high-risk by that score, whereas a subject with a Framingham risk score (or modified Framingham risk score)<10% was defined as low-risk. A subject with a 2013 ACC/AHA risk score≥7.5% was defined as high-risk by that score, whereas a subject with a 2013 ACC/AHA risk score<7.5% was defined as low-risk. A subject with a discordant risk score was defined as one who had a Framingham risk score (or modified Framingham risk score) that characterized him/her as low-risk and a 2013 ACC/AHA risk score that characterized him/her as high risk. Associations of demographic, CV, and rheumatologic characteristics with discordant risk scores were analyzed using chi-squared tests for categorical variables and using independent t-tests for continuous variables.

Results 11 (7.0%) of the 157 SLE subjects and 11 (11.5%) of the 96 RA subjects had discordant CV risk scores with low Framingham risk scores but high ACC/AHA risk scores. When the 1.5 multiplier was applied to the Framingham risk score, the number of subjects with discordant risk scores did not significantly change. Rheumatologic disease duration, CRP levels, African-American race, diabetes, current use of anti-hypertensive medication, higher age, and higher systolic blood pressure were all significantly associated with discordant risk scores.

Conclusions Approximately 10% of SLE and RA subjects had discordant 10-year CV risk scores with low Framingham risk scores but high ACC/AHA risk scores, even when a 1.5 multiplier was applied to the Framingham risk score. Prospective studies are needed to address the ability of different CV risk assessment tools, such as the 2013 ACC/AHA risk score, Framingham risk score, and modified risk scores, to predict CV events in rheumatologic patients, especially those with risk factors associated with discordant risk scores.

Disclosure of Interest None declared

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