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SP0095 Eular recommendations for the use of imaging in the diagnosis and management of large vessel vasculitis in clinical practice
  1. C Dejaco1,2,
  2. on behalf of Taks force to develop the EULAR recommendations for the use of imaging in LVV
  1. 1Rheumatology, Medical University Graz, Graz, Austria
  2. 2Rheumatology Service, Hospital of Bruneck, Bruneck, Italy

Abstract

Large vessel vasculitis (LVV) is the most common form of primary vasculitis comprising giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis (TA).

Although temporal artery biopsy and conventional angiography are still the golden standard diagnostic tests for GCA and TA, respectively, modern imaging methods including ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography (CT) and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography - CT are increasingly used. In clinical practice however, these methods are inconsistently applied and rheumatologists and other specialists are still uncertain about the specific value of these modalities.

This project has been conducted with the aim to provide user-friendly, evidence-based recommendations for the use of modern imaging methods for diagnosis, monitoring and outcome prediction of primary LVV. Specifically, we give advice on 1) when to use these imaging techniques, 2) what specialists might conclude from imaging results and 3) what technical standards are required to achieve high quality imaging results.

These recommendations aim at an early and specific diagnosis as well as an improved assessment of LVV, thus ultimately leading to better outcomes of patients with LVV.

Disclosure of Interest C. Dejaco Grant/research support from: Pfizer, MSD, Esaote, Speakers bureau: Pfizer, MSD, AbVie, Celgene, UCB, Roche, BMS, GSK, Novartis, Sandoz

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