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THU0068 The risk of individual autoantibodies, autoantibody combinations and autoantibody levels for arthritis development in clinically suspect arthralgia
  1. RM Ten Brinck,
  2. HW van Steenbergen,
  3. MA van Delft,
  4. MK Verheul,
  5. RE Toes,
  6. LA Trouw,
  7. AH van der Helm-van Mil
  1. Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, Netherlands

Abstract

Background Autoantibody testing is helpful to predict progression to arthritis in subjects at risk. Previous longitudinal studies mainly focussed on autoantibody-positive arthralgia patients. Consequently predictive values of autoantibodies were evaluated relative to each other. This study assessed risks of having anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA), rheumatoid factor (RF) and/or anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) for arthritis development in arthralgia patients considered at risk for RA by rheumatologists based on clinical characteristics (Clinically Suspect Arthralgia, CSA).

Objectives To assess risks of having anticitrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA), rheumatoid factor (RF) and/or anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) for arthritis development in arthralgia patients considered at risk for RA by rheumatologists based on clinical characteristics (CSA).

Methods Baseline ACPA, RF and anti-CarP antibodies of 241 patients, consecutively included in the CSA-cohort, were studied in relation to development of clinical arthritis during a median follow-up of 103 (IQR 81–114) weeks.

Results ACPA, RF and anti-CarP antibodies were all univariably associated with arthritis development, hazard ratios (95% CI) were 8.5 (4.7–15.5), 5.1 (2.8–9.3) and 3.9 (1.9–7.7). Only ACPA, and not RF or anti-CarP, was independently associated (HR 5.1, 2.0–13.2). Relative to autoantibody-negative CSA-patients, ACPA-negative/RF-positive patients had HRs of 2.6 (1.04–6.6), ACPA-positive/RF-negative patients 8.0 (2.4–27.4), and ACPA-positive/RF-positive patients 10.5 (5.4–20.6, Figure). PPVs for development of clinical arthritis within two years were: 38% for ACPA-negative/RF-positive, 50% for ACPA-positive/RF-negative, and 67% for ACPA-positive/RF-positive patients. Higher ACPA-levels were not significantly associated with increased progression to clinical arthritis, in contrast to higher RF-levels. Autoantibody levels were stable during follow-up.

Conclusions ACPA conferred the highest risk for arthritis development and had an additive value to RF. However, >30% of ACPA-positive/RF-positive CSA-patients did not develop arthritis during two-year follow-up. Thus CSA and information on autoantibodies is insufficient to accurately identify imminent autoantibody-positive RA.

Disclosure of Interest None declared

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