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THU0432 Long-Term (104-Week) Safety Profile of Apremilast, An Oral Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, In Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Pooled Safety Analysis of Three Phase 3, Randomized, Controlled Trials
  1. P. Mease1,
  2. A. Adebajo2,
  3. D. Gladman3,
  4. J. Gomez-Reino4,
  5. S. Hall5,
  6. A. Kavanaugh6,
  7. E. Lespessailles7,
  8. G. Schett8,
  9. K. Shah9,
  10. L. Teng9,
  11. J. Wollenhaupt10
  1. 1Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, United States
  2. 2University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom
  3. 3Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, Canada
  4. 4Hospital Clinico Universitario, Santiago, Spain
  5. 5Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
  6. 6University of California, San Diego, United States
  7. 7University of Orléans, Orléans, France
  8. 8University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
  9. 9Celgene Corporation, Warren, United States
  10. 10Schön Klinik Hamburg Eilbek, Hamburg, Germany

Abstract

Background Apremilast (APR), a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, helps regulate the immune responses in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). PALACE 1-3 compared APR efficacy/safety with placebo (PBO) in patients (pts) with active PsA despite prior conventional DMARDs and/or biologics.

Objectives Overall APR safety/tolerability was assessed in a pooled analysis of PALACE 1-3, with APR exposure ≤104 wks.

Methods Pts were randomized (1:1:1) to PBO, APR 20 mg BID (APR20), or APR 30 mg BID (APR30) stratified by baseline DMARD use (yes/no). The PBO-controlled phase continued to Wk 24, with an early escape option at Wk 16. Double-blind APR treatment continued to Wk 52; pts could continue to receive APR during an open-label, long-term treatment phase. We report safety findings from the APR-exposure period (Wks 0 to ≤104).

Results 1493 pts were randomized and received ≥1 dose of study medication (PBO: n=495; APR20: n=501; APR30: n=497). A total of 1441 (1209.3 pt-yrs) and 1028 (907.7 pt-yrs) pts received APR in the Wk 0 to ≤52 and Wk >52 to ≤104 periods, respectively. During Wks 0 to ≤52, AEs occurring in ≥5% of APR-exposed pts were diarrhea, nausea, headache, URTI, and nasopharyngitis (Table). Most AEs were mild/moderate in severity during the Wk 0 to ≤104 APR-exposure period; in general, no increase was seen in the incidence/severity of AEs with longer term exposure. During Wks >52 to ≤104, diarrhea (2.9%), nausea (1.8%), and headache (3.0%) occurred at lower rates vs Wks 0 to ≤52 (Table). In Wks 0 to ≤52, 87 pts reported serious AEs (SAEs) vs 71 pts in Wks >52 to ≤104. In few system organ classes, there were numerically more pts reporting SAEs but it did not indicate any specific organ involvement. The vast majority of the SAEs were reported by 1 pt each. There was no increase in cardiac, malignant neoplasm, opportunistic infection, or psychiatric disorder related SAEs and no cases of tuberculosis (new/reactivation) reported with either APR dose. Discontinuations due to AEs occurred at a lower rate (2.3%) during Wks >52 to ≤104. Marked laboratory abnormalities were generally infrequent and most returned to baseline with continued treatment or were associated with a concurrent medical condition.

Conclusions APR demonstrated an acceptable safety profile and was generally well tolerated for up to 104 wks, with no new safety concerns identified with long-term exposure. These data continue to support the lack of a need for specific laboratory monitoring with APR.

Disclosure of Interest P. Mease Grant/research support from: Abbott, Amgen, Biogen Idec, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Genentech, Janssen, Eli Lilly, Pfizer Inc, UCB, Celgene Corporation, Novartis, and Roche, Consultant for: Abbott, Amgen, Biogen Idec, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Genentech, Janssen, Eli Lilly, Pfizer Inc, UCB, Celgene Corporation, Novartis, and Roche, Speakers bureau: Abbott, Amgen, Biogen Idec, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Genentech, Janssen, Eli Lilly, Pfizer Inc, and UCB, A. Adebajo: None declared, D. Gladman Grant/research support from: AbbVie, Amgen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Janssen, Pfizer Inc, Novartis, and UCB, Consultant for: AbbVie, Amgen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Janssen, Pfizer Inc, Novartis, and UCB, J. Gomez-Reino Grant/research support from: Roche and Schering-Plough, Consultant for: Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer Inc, Roche, Schering-Plough, and UCB SA, Speakers bureau: Bristol-Myers Squibb, Roche, Schering-Plough, and Wyeth, S. Hall Consultant for: Boehringer Ingelheim, MSD, Roche Schering Plough, Servier, and Wyeth., Paid instructor for: Amgen, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Centocor, GlaxoSmithKline, MSD, Pfizer, Sanofi Aventis, Sanofi Pasteur, Schering-Plough, Serono, and Wyeth, Speakers bureau: Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, MSD, Pfizer, Roche, Sanofi Aventis, Schering-Plough, and Wyeth;, A. Kavanaugh Grant/research support from: Abbott, Amgen, Astra-Zeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celgene Corporation, Centocor-Janssen, Pfizer Inc, Roche, and UCB, E. Lespessailles Grant/research support from: Amgen, Eli Lilly, Novartis, and Servier, Speakers bureau: Amgen, Eli Lilly, Novartis, and Servier, G. Schett Grant/research support from: Abbott, Celgene Corporation, Roche, and UCB, Consultant for: Abbott, Celgene Corporation, Roche, and UCB, K. Shah Employee of: Celgene Corporation, L. Teng Employee of: Celgene Corporation, J. Wollenhaupt Grant/research support from: Abbott, Bristol-Myers Squibb, MSD, Pfizer Inc, and UCB, Consultant for: Abbott, Bristol-Myers Squibb, MSD, Pfizer Inc, and UCB

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