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AB0340 Fecal Calprotectin in Rheumatoid Disease, and Its Relation to Disease State
  1. M. Tayel1,
  2. M.H. Abdel Megid2,
  3. H.H. Nouh2,
  4. B. Rofaeil2
  1. 1Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine
  2. 2Internal Medicine, Alexandria Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria, Egypt

Abstract

Background Calprotectin is a calcium binding protein with antimicrobial activity derived from neutrophils and monocytes. It has a clinical relevance to some inflammatory diseases, mainly inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Some studies show a correlation with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

Objectives to evaluate fecal calprotectin in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients (pts) and its correlation to lower GIT symptoms and inflammatory markers.

Methods Demographic features, clinical presentation, pattern of GIT involvement, mode of therapy, laboratory markers, DAS 28 and fecal calprotectin levels using ELISA were assessed for 50 RA patients (group I) and 20 healthy subjects as control group (group II).

Results The mean age was 42.4±10.19 yrs in RA pt with no significant difference between group I and II in all demographic data. GIT symptoms are mainly abdominal pains in 75%, constipation in 40%, bloody stools with tenesmus in 15%, and diarrhea in 5%. Two GIT symptoms were reported by more than 35% of pts. Mean fecal calprotectin level was 56±10.27 ug/g and 38.12±6.11 ug/g for group I and II, with high stastistical difference (p=0.008). There is a significant increased level of fecal calprotectin in positive cases of RF, with increased CRP and ESR and high DAS 28. Also, there was is statistically significant relation between GIT symptoms and NSAIDs intake, and between fecal calprotectin levels and the use of NSAIDs, steroids and salycilates.

Table 1.

Correlation between fecal calprotectin and rheumatoid laboratory markers

Conclusions GIT symptoms are not uncommon in RA. Calprotectin fecal assay correlates positively with GIT symptoms severity and frequency, laboratory markers of disease activity and DAS 28 could be a simple non invasive tool to identify patients with NSAID entropathy.

References

  1. Garcia-Arias M, Pascual-Salcedo D, Ramiro S, et al. Calprotectin in rheumatoid arthritis. Molecular diagnosis and therapy 2013; 17: 49-56.

Disclosure of Interest None declared

DOI 10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-eular.3345

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