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AB1126 Acute Effect on Pain and ROM of Two Different Active Movement Approaches in Knee Osteoarthritis
  1. M.A. Oral1,
  2. E. Ünal2,
  3. E. Camci1,
  4. I. Duzgun1
  1. 1Gazi University Faculty of Health Science Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation
  2. 2Hacettepe University Faculty of Health Science Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Ankara, Turkey

Abstract

Background Movement inhibition and pain are common symptoms of osteoarthritis. Therefore, movement restoration and pain inhibition are one of the most important aims of physical therapy applications [1,2].

Objectives Aim of this study is to compare acute effects of two different active movement approaches in patients with movement inhibition due to acute knee pain associated with osteoarthritis.

Methods 50 patients with knee osteoarthritis (13 men, 37 women; between 50 and 70 years-old) participated in this study. Also, all patients have complained about movement inhibition due to acute knee pain. Participants were randomly separated to two intervention groups; active movement or mobilization with active movement. Before and immediately after the application, pain severity during rest and activity were measured by visual analog scale, pain sensation was measured by algometer and knee range of motion was measured by standard goniometer [3].

Results There were significant improvements in knee flexion and extension range of motion, pain sensation and pain severity in mobilization with active movement group (p<0,05). Conversely, in active movement group there were no differences in knee extension range of motion and pain sensitivity (p>0,05), but the knee flexion range of motion had statistically significant improvements (p<0,05).

Table 1.

Before and immediately after the application, different active movement tecnhniques' effects on range of motion, pain severity and pain sensation

Conclusions In this study both mobilization with active movement and active movement approaches were found effective in patients with movement inhibition due to acute knee pain associated with osteoarthritis. Mobilization with active movement should be considered as an alternative method for treatment in knee osteoarthritis.

References

  1. Jackson BD., W.A., Teichtal AJ. et.al. (2004) Reviewing knee osteoarthritis a biomechanical perspective. J. Science Med. Sport, 7:3, 347-357.

  2. Wu CW., K.K. (2005) New developments in osteoarthritis. Clinical Geriatr Med., 21:3, 589-601.

  3. Teys P., B.L., Vicenzino B. (2006) The inital effects of a Mulligan's mobilization with movement technique on range of movement and pressure pain threshold in pain-limited shoulders. Manual Therapy, 13, 37-42.

Disclosure of Interest None declared

DOI 10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-eular.3803

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