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FRI0085 Social status of adult patients with childhood onset arthritis
  1. N. Muravieva1,
  2. Y. Muraviev1
  1. 1Federal State Budgetary Instuitution “Research Institute Of Rheumatology” Of Rus.Acad.Med.Sci., Moscow, Russian Federation

Abstract

Background Problems of social rehabilitation of adult patients with childhood onset arthritis are not well studied though very urgent.

Objectives To assess social status of adult patients with childhood onset arthritis.

Methods Analysis of database of adult patients with childhood onset arthritis. Activity of the disease (according to DAS28), functional class (FC) according Steinbrocker and social status of patients (education, work activity, marital status) were assessed.

Results Database contains information on 210 adult patients with childhood onset arthritis: 157 women, 53 men in age from 16-64 (mean 24.6±8.3) years, with disease duration of 16.2±8.7 (1-50) years. Disease activity was found in 85.2% of patients (I – in 127, II – in 43, III – in 9), remission – in 31 (including non-medicamental - in 16 patients). The majority of patients (87.6%) had the II FC, 4 patients move in wheel-chair. Bone fractures were found in 8 patients, joint prosthetics – in 20 patients. Two patients have depraved vision on the level of color distinguishing. At present higher education was finished or in the process of continuation by 46 patients, special education was finished or in the process of continuation by 144 patients. Only school education is peculiar to 9.5% of patients. Out of those with full education (110 patients) 73 are working, while 37 patients are in dependence. 52 patients have family (94% - women), 34 patients (91% - women) have children: one – 25, two – 7, three - 1, six -1.

Conclusions The majority of adult patients with childhood onset arthritis are socially adapted: 90% have (or continued) education; 66% with full education are working; every 4th has family, every 6th has a child. At the same time the third of patients do not work are not getting education and, consequently, need social rehabilitation.

References Packham J.C., Hall M.A. Long-term follow-up of 246 adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: social function, relationships and sexual activity. Rheumatology, 2002, 41, 1440-1443.

Disclosure of Interest None Declared

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