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FRI0465-HPR Association between one leg stand test, self-reported knee instability and activity limitations in patients with established knee osteoarthritis
  1. D.C. Sanchez-Ramirez1,2,
  2. M. van der Leeden1,2,3,
  3. L.D. Roorda1,
  4. S. Verschueren4,
  5. W. Lems2,5,
  6. J. Dekker1,2,3,6
  1. 1Rehabilitation Research, Reade
  2. 2Rheumatology
  3. 3Rehabilitation medicine and EMGO institute, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  4. 4Rehabilitation, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
  5. 5Rheumatology, Reade
  6. 6Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Abstract

Background To our knowledge it is still unknown if there is a correlation between an easy to implement balance test such as one leg stand test (OLST), with self-reported knee instability and functional ability in patients with established knee osteoarthritis (OA).

Objectives To determine the association between one leg stand test (OLST), self-reported knee instability and activity limitations in a cohort of patients with established knee osteoarthritis (OA).

Methods Data are from 294 patients with established knee OA from the Amsterdam Osteoarthritis cohort. In the OLST, the patient was asked to stand on one leg for 30 seconds without additional support. Activity limitations were assessed using performance test (i.e. Get Up and Go test (GUG), and a stair climbing-descending test) and a questionnaire (Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index-subscale Physical Function (WOMAC-PF). Self-reported knee instability was reported as episodes of buckling, shifting or giving way of the knee in the previous three months. Regression analyses were used to assess the association between OLST and self-reported knee instability and activity limitations.

Results Completion of OLST was highly associated with less time performing the GUG test (-2.67, p<0.001) and walking up-down stairs (-7.86, p<0.001), and lower WOMAC-PF score (-5.46, p<0.001). The associations were less strong but still significant for the GUG test and time walking up-down stairs after adjustment for BMI, laxity, ROM active flexion, muscle strength and pain. A significant association was observed between OLST and self-reported knee instability (OR=0.57, p=0.038); however it disappeared after adjustment for BMI, ROM active flexion, muscle strength or pain.

Conclusions It was found that OLST was highly associated with performance-based activity limitations in persons with knee OA, but not with WOMAC-PF score and self reported knee instability when taking into account relevant co-variables. OLST is an easy to implement balance evaluation tool which requires only limited space and time. It may be helpful detecting targets for treatment of patients with knee OA.

Disclosure of Interest None Declared

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