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Anti-Golgi autoantibodies are not clinically associated with systemic autoimmune diseases
  1. Pieter Vermeersch1,
  2. Karolien Van den Bergh1,
  3. Daniel Blockmans2,
  4. Rene Westhovens3,
  5. Xavier Bossuyt1
  1. 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Immunology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
  2. 2Department of General Internal Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
  3. 3Department of Rheumatology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
  1. Correspondence to Xavier Bossuyt, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Immunology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium; Xavier.bossuyt{at}uz.kuleuven.be

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Anti-Golgi antibodies were first described in 1982 in a patient with Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) with a lymphoma.1 They have mainly been reported in patients with SjS and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE),2 3 but also in patients with other systemic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis4 and non-autoimmune disorders such as idiopathic cerebellar ataxia5 and HIV infection.6 Transient low titres have also been reported in patients with a probable viral infection.7

Anti-Golgi antibodies are rare3 and give a characteristic speckled staining on indirect immunofluorescence composed of irregular granules adjacent to one side of the nucleus. Different autoantigens have been identified including giantin/macrogolgin and different golgins,8 but …

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