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Does low-field dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) reliably detect bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis? A comparison of two different E-MRI units and conventional radiography with high-resolution CT scanning
  1. A Duer-Jensen1,
  2. B Ejbjerg2,
  3. E Albrecht-Beste3,
  4. A Vestergaard3,
  5. U Møller Døhn1,
  6. M Lund Hetland1,
  7. M Østergaard4
  1. 1
    Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Hvidovre, Denmark
  2. 2
    Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Frederiksberg, Denmark
  3. 3
    Department of Radiology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Hvidovre, Denmark
  4. 4
    Departments of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospitals at Hvidovre and Herlev, Denmark
  1. Dr A Duer-Jensen, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Kettegaards Allé 30, 2635 Hvidovre, Denmark; anne-duer{at}dadlnet.dk

Abstract

Objectives: To compare the ability of two different E-MRI units and conventional radiography (CR) to identify bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints with CT scanning as the standard reference method.

Methods: 20 patients with RA and 5 controls underwent CR, CT and two E-MRI examinations (Esaote Biomedica Artoscan and MagneVu MV1000) of one hand during a 2-week period. In all modalities, each bone of the wrist and MCP joints was blindly evaluated for erosions. MagneVu images were also assessed for the proportion of each bone being visualised.

Results: 550 bones were examined. CT, Artoscan, MagneVu and CR detected 188, 116, 55 and 45 bones with erosions, respectively. The majority were located in the carpal bones. The sensitivity of the Artoscan for detecting erosions was higher than that of the MagneVu and CR (MCP joints: 0.68, 0.54 and 0.57, respectively; wrists: 0.50, 0.23 and 0.29). Corresponding specificities for detecting erosions were 0.94, 0.93 and 0.99, respectively, in the MCP joints and 0.92, 0.98 and 0.98 in the wrist. The MagneVu allowed visualisation of 1.5 cm of the ventral-dorsal diameter of the bone. In the wrist, 31.6% of bones were visualised entirely and 37.9% of bones were 67–99% visualised. In MCP joints, 84.2% of bones were visualised entirely and 15.8% of bones were 67–99% visualised.

Conclusion: With CT as the reference method for detecting erosions in RA hands, the Artoscan showed higher sensitivity than the MagneVu and CR. All imaging modalities had high specificities. The better performance of the Artoscan should be considered when selecting an imaging method in RA.

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Footnotes

  • Competing interests: None.

  • Funding: Financial support was received from The Danish Rheumatism Association, Elisabeth and Karl Ejnar Nis-Hanssens Memorial Award and Departments for Research, Quality and Education, Southern Region.

  • Ethics approval: Local ethics committee approval was obtained before starting the studies and all participants gave informed consent.

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