Article Text

PDF
High blood levels of chromogranin A in giant cell arteritis identify patients refractory to corticosteroid treatment
  1. G Di Comite1,
  2. P Previtali1,
  3. C M Rossi1,
  4. G Dell’Antonio1,
  5. P Rovere-Querini1,
  6. L Praderio1,
  7. L Dagna1,
  8. A Corti2,
  9. C Doglioni1,
  10. A Maseri1,
  11. M G Sabbadini1,
  12. A A Manfredi1
  1. 1
    Departments of Medicine, Cardiology and Pathology, H San Raffaele Scientific Institute & Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Milano, Italy
  2. 2
    Department of Oncology and IIT Network Research Unit of Molecular Neuroscience, H San Raffaele Scientific Institute & University, Milano, Italy
  1. A A Manfredi, H San Raffaele, DIBIT 3A1, via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milano, Italy; manfredi.angelo{at}hsr.it

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Giant cell arteritis (GCA) rapidly responds to high-dose corticosteroids. However, smouldering arterial inflammation can persist despite the absence of symptoms and altered acute phase reactants. In patients that are refractory, symptoms relapse during steroid tapering and vascular complications may develop. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) level are not sensitive enough markers to detect refractory disease.1 The neuroendocrine system regulates innate and acquired immune responses, influencing cytokine synthesis and limiting tissue damage via release of neurotransmitters and peptides in peripheral tissues. Chromogranin A in particular is a candidate marker linking neurogenic inflammation and vascular inflammation.2 We investigated by ELISA, as described previously,3 the …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.