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High prevalence of autoantibodies to muscarinic-3 acetylcholine receptor in patients with juvenile-onset Sjögren syndrome
  1. Y Nakamura1,
  2. E Wakamatsu1,
  3. I Matsumoto1,
  4. M Tomiita2,
  5. Y Kohno2,
  6. M Mori3,
  7. S Yokota3,
  8. D Goto1,
  9. S Ito1,
  10. A Tsutsumi1,
  11. T Sumida1
  1. 1
    Division of Clinical Immunology, Major of Advanced Biological Applications, Graduate School Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Japan
  2. 2
    Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Japan
  3. 3
    Department of Pediatrics, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, Yokohama, Japan
  1. Dr Takayuki Sumida, Division of Clinical Immunology, Major of Advanced Biological Applications, Graduate School Comprehensive Human Science, University of Tsukuba, Japan, 1–1–1 Tennodai, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki 305–8575, Japan; tsumida{at}md.tsukuba.ac.jp

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Sjögren syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease characterised pathologically by lymphocytic infiltration into the lacrimal and salivary glands, and clinically by dry eyes and mouth. Lymphocytic infiltration is also found in the kidneys, lungs, thyroid, and liver. Immunohistochemical studies have shown that most infiltrating lymphocytes around the labial salivary and lacrimal glands and the kidneys are CD4-positive αβT cells.1 Candidate autoantigens recognised by T cells that infiltrate the labial salivary glands of SS have been analysed and Ro/SS-A 52 kDa,2 α-amylase, heat shock protein, and TCR BV63 have been identified, although Ro/SS-A 52 kDa reactive T cells were not increased in peripheral blood. …

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