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Association of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and a novel candidate locus, LOC127086, with systemic lupus erythematosus
  1. Henk A Martens1,*,
  2. Ilja M Nolte4,*,
  3. Gerrit van der Steege2,
  4. Martijn Schipper2,
  5. Cees G M Kallenberg1,
  6. Gerard J te Meerman3,
  7. Marc Bijl1
  1. 1Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
  2. 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Section Medical Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
  3. 3Department of Medical Genetics, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
  1. Correspondence to:
    MrHenk A Martens
    Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, PO Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen, The Netherlands;h.a.martens{at}int.umcg.nl

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Genetic predisposition probably plays an important part in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Several loci have been suggested to be related to SLE, among which is the 1q41–42 region on chromosome 1.1 This region is homologous to the Sle1 region in an SLE mouse model.2 One of the genes on this region is the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) gene, which has been associated with SLE in several studies. This gene encodes a nuclear enzyme involved in DNA repair and apoptosis, and its activity is reduced in patients with SLE,3 thereby possibly facilitating autoimmunity and inflammation. However, conflicting results with regard to this association …

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