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Antibodies to C reactive protein
  1. B J Rosenau,
  2. P H Schur
  1. Division of Rheumatology/Immunology/Allergy, Department of Medicine, and the Department of Clinical Laboratories, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to:
    Professor Peter H Schur
    Department of Clinical Laboratories, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; pschur{at}partners.org

Abstract

Background: C reactive protein (CRP) is a known indicator of inflammation. Serum CRP is often raised in patients with inflammatory conditions.

Objective: To determine whether individuals make antibodies to CRP and whether this might affect serum CRP concentrations. Methods: An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was developed for the detection of antibodies to CRP. Specificity of the reaction was determined by inhibition of the reaction.

Results: Sera from 413 patients were tested and 25 were found to be positive, particularly in patients with rheumatic diseases. Levels of anti-CRP did not correlate with serum CRP levels.

Conclusions: The presence of low CRP levels may not reflect the presence of antibodies to CRP.

  • CRP, C reactive protein
  • SAA, serum amyloid A
  • anti-CRP
  • C reactive protein

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Footnotes

  • Published Online First 21 September 2005

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