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No evidence of parvovirus B19 in tissue samples from patients with polyarteritis nodosa and microscopic polyangiitis as assessed by the polymerase chain reaction
  1. Z Sachetto1,
  2. S C B Costa2,
  3. P D Andrade2,
  4. R A Conde1,
  5. E M I Amstalden3,
  6. A M Samara1,
  7. S R M Fernandes1
  1. 1Department of Rheumatology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), PO Box 6111, 13083-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil
  2. 2Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), PO Box 6111, 13083-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil
  3. 3Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), PO Box 6111, 13083-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr Z Sachetto
    zsachetto{at}uol.com.br; srmfer{at}uol.com.br

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Parvovirus B19 (B19) has been implicated in the aetiopathogenesis of some cases of systemic vasculitis, mainly giant cell arteritis.1 A positive serological test for B19 has been reported in a few patients with polyarteritis nodosa (PAN).2–4

As far as we know no studies of B19 DNA in tissue samples of patients with PAN have been published, so we used a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach to screen for B19 DNA in fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples from patients with PAN and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). The diagnosis was based on the Chapell-Hill Consensus Conference guidelines.5 Only tissue samples from patients with vasculitis were used for DNA preparations.

DNA was extracted using a commercial kit (DNeasy tissue kit, Quiagen). A nested PCR for B19 was carried out using a previously published set …

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