Article Text

PDF
Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome associated with primary angiitis of the central nervous system: report of two biopsy proven cases
  1. M Quintero1,
  2. N Mirza1,
  3. H Chang2,
  4. A Perl1
  1. 1Section of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, College of Medicine, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
  2. 2Department of Pathology, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, College of Medicine, Syracuse, NY, 13210, USA
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr A Perl
    State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, College of Medicine, 750 East Adams Street, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA; perla{at}upstate.edu

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) remains one of the most challenging forms of vasculitis. Its diagnosis requires the presence of an acquired neurological deficit, classic angiographic evidence consistent with vasculitis or histopathological demonstration of angiitis within the central nervous system (CNS), and no evidence of systemic vasculitis or another autoimmune, infectious or malignant process.1 Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) involves recurrent arterial or venous thrombosis, pregnancy loss, and repeated detection of anticardiolipin antibodies or lupus anticoagulant at least 6 weeks apart.2 APS may result in neurological complications such as stroke, migraine, chorea, seizures or transverse myelitis. There has been no reported association between APS and PACNS. We present the first two cases of PACNS and simultaneous APS.

Patient 1 is a 76 year old man presenting with headaches, mental status changes progressing to somnolence, and neurological …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.