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A family with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis
  1. C Gorman,
  2. A S M Jawad,
  3. I Chikanza
  1. Rheumatology Department, Newham University Hospital, Glen Road, London E13 8SL, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr A S M Jawad
    The Royal London Hospital, Bancroft Road, London E1 4DG, UK; alismjawad1hotmail.com

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We report a family with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). The most striking occurrence was severe cervical disease without extensive dorsal involvement. From the tissue typing results of our two sibling patients, it appears less likely that, if there is a hereditary component, it is linked to HLA status. It remains to be seen whether this is a new disease entity or an unusual familial variant of DISH. We are unaware of a similar published report.

A 23 year old man was referred with a painful stiff neck of 3 years’ duration. On examination, all movements of his cervical spine were restricted. Other spinal movements were normal. Inflammatory markers were normal and HLA-B27 was negative. An x ray examination of the sacroiliac joints, thoracic and lumbar spine were unremarkable. However, the cervical spine radiograph showed gross anterior osteophytosis (fig 1A).

Figure 1

 Lateral x ray findings of the cervical spine of the son (A), the daughter (B), and the father (C), showing severe anterior osteophytosis.

This man’s 24 year old sister had been seen 7 years previously. She described a 6 year history of worsening neck pain and stiffness. On examination, movements of the cervical spine were severely limited in all directions, with mild limitation of the thoracic spine. An x ray examination and inflammatory markers were normal and HLA-B27 was negative. Five years later, the clinical findings had scarcely changed. However, although the sacroiliac joints were still normal, there was now marked osteophytosis around the hip joints with gross osteophytosis and ankylosis of the cervical spine (fig 1B). Two years later, this advanced cervical pathology precipitated cervical myelopathy.

The father of these patients was first seen at 52 years of age despite having a “30 year history of ankylosing spondylitis”. He had a strong family history of the disease, with brother, sister, and mother affected. On examination, all spinal movements were markedly reduced. Movements of both hips were severely restricted and bilateral elbow fixed flexion deformities were present. Inflammatory markers were normal and HLA-B27 was negative. An x ray examination showed normal sacroiliac joints, advanced osteophytosis and degeneration of the hip joints, and ankylosis of the cervical spine (fig 1C). His hip disease required prompt replacement surgery.

All these patients had radiological changes suggestive of DISH. Two of this patient’s siblings also had the disease, as do his other two offspring (they are receiving care at different hospitals). The first two patients described here were tissue typed: these siblings only shared alleles at DRB3 and the C locus, which occur frequently in the general population.

DISH is an ossifying, non-inflammatory, non-erosive enthesopathy favouring the dorsal spine but sparing the sacroiliac joints. By contrast, ankylosing spondylitis is an inflammatory condition with enthesopathies facing joints, always affecting the sacroiliac joints. DISH affects 3–6% of the population over 40 years of age and 11% aged over 70 years.1 It is twice as common in men and occurs more frequently in certain racial groups: it is common in Japanese and Pima Indians but rare in black and Asian races.1 Other causes of hyperostosis or bony excrescences include spondylitis deformans, ankylosing spondylitis, trauma, fluorosis, treatment with retinoids, ochronosis, acromegaly, hypoparathyroidism, and x-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia, but there was nothing in the history, physical examination, or the investigations to suggest that our three patients had any of those conditions.2

In the cervical spine, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is commonly seen. This phenomenon is often called “Japanese disease” owing to its predominance in the Japanese population.3 OPLL displays a strong genetic component with high concordance in twins and families.4,5 Various modes of inheritance have been suggested, including HLA linkage.6 In DISH, however, although there are racial differences, no strong familial tendency has been demonstrated. Neither is there a proven HLA link, as found between HLA-B27 and the spondyloarthropathies.

Although our patients were diagnosed as DISH, there are some atypical features. The most striking of these is severe cervical disease without extensive dorsal involvement. Forestier and Rotes-Querol in their classification criteria, considered involvement of at least three intervertebral bodies in the dorsal spine to be essential.7 However, Utsinger’s criteria do not include this as a necessary feature.8 One similar case has been described: a 71 year old patient presented with similar cervical findings and sparing of the dorsal spine and sacroiliac joints. Difficulty was found classifying the condition as either DISH or ankylosing spondylitis.9 Another unusual feature in our cases is the strong familial pattern. From the tissue typing results of our two sibling patients, it appears less likely that, if there is a hereditary component, it is linked to HLA status.

It thus remains to be seen whether this is a new disease entity or an unusual familial variant of DISH.

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