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Telomerase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with SLE
  1. D KUROSAKA,
  2. Y OZAWA,
  3. J YASUDA,
  4. T YOKOYAMA,
  5. A YAMADA
  1. Division of Rheumatology
  2. Department of Internal Medicine
  3. Jikei University School of Medicine
  4. Department of Paediatrics
  5. Jikei University School of Medicine
  6. Department of Molecular Immunology
  7. Institute of DNA Medicine
  8. Jikei University School of Medicine
  9. Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology
  10. Department of Internal Medicine
  11. Jikei University School of Medicine
  1. d_kurosaka{at}jikei.ac.jp
  1. M AKIYAMA
  1. Division of Rheumatology
  2. Department of Internal Medicine
  3. Jikei University School of Medicine
  4. Department of Paediatrics
  5. Jikei University School of Medicine
  6. Department of Molecular Immunology
  7. Institute of DNA Medicine
  8. Jikei University School of Medicine
  9. Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology
  10. Department of Internal Medicine
  11. Jikei University School of Medicine
  1. d_kurosaka{at}jikei.ac.jp
  1. S SAITO
  1. Division of Rheumatology
  2. Department of Internal Medicine
  3. Jikei University School of Medicine
  4. Department of Paediatrics
  5. Jikei University School of Medicine
  6. Department of Molecular Immunology
  7. Institute of DNA Medicine
  8. Jikei University School of Medicine
  9. Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology
  10. Department of Internal Medicine
  11. Jikei University School of Medicine
  1. d_kurosaka{at}jikei.ac.jp
  1. N TAJIMA
  1. Division of Rheumatology
  2. Department of Internal Medicine
  3. Jikei University School of Medicine
  4. Department of Paediatrics
  5. Jikei University School of Medicine
  6. Department of Molecular Immunology
  7. Institute of DNA Medicine
  8. Jikei University School of Medicine
  9. Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology
  10. Department of Internal Medicine
  11. Jikei University School of Medicine
  1. d_kurosaka{at}jikei.ac.jp

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Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that adds the telomeric sequence to the terminal of chromosomes, prevents shortening of telomere, and maintains the complete telomeric structure.1It has been recently reported that an increase in telomerase activity is associated with the activation of lymphocytes,2-7 and, in general, much attention has been paid to the role of telomerase in immunopathology. Katayama et al reported the telomerase activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).8 They analysed 17 patients with SLE, and the telomerase activity in peripheral mononuclear cells was increased to 64.7%. Thus, in this study, we divided patients with SLE into treated and untreated groups, and measured the telomerase activity of peripheral mononuclear cells.

Thirteen patients with SLE (1 man, 12 women) with a mean (SD) age of 30.7 (6.5) years (range 19–61) were enrolled in this study. All patients fulfilled the 1997 revised American Rheumatism Association criteria. As a control group, 10 normal volunteers, six women aged 19–41 and four men aged 30–37, were also included in the study. After informed consent had been obtained, 10 ml of peripheral blood was taken and heparinised. The mononuclear cell fraction was isolated from 10 ml of heparinised peripheral blood by Ficoll-Paque (Sigma Inc, St Louis, USA) density gradient centrifugation. A sample of 1.0×106mononuclear cells was analysed by the TRAP assay method. The TRAP assay was performed with a TRAPeze telomerase detection kit produced by the Intergen Company (Purchase, NY, USA). The level of telomerase activity was expressed by a ratio of the entire TRAP ladders to an internal control band.

Table 1 shows the telomerase activity level data and clinical data used for determining the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Significant differences (p=0.006) were detected in the telomerase activity level between the control group, untreated SLE group, and treated SLE group by Kruskal-Wallis test with a significance level of 5%. For multiple comparisons the Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate intergroup differences after lowering the significance level using Bonferroni's technique. The p value was 0.002 between the control group and untreated SLE group, 0.005 between the untreated SLE group and treated SLE group, and 0.118 between the control group and treated SLE group. Compared with other groups, telomerase activity was significantly higher in the SLE untreated group. The Spearman rank correlation test with a significance level of 5% showed a significant positive relationship between telomerase activity and SLEDAI in the SLE group with a correlation coefficient of 0.872 and p value of 0.003. The relation between telomerase activity and clinical data in SLEDAI was also analysed using the Spearman rank correlation test with a significance level of 5% in the SLE group. The correlation coefficient and p value were −0.614 and 0.033 between telomerase activity and white blood cell count, −0.715 and 0.013 between telomerase activity and serum complement activity, and 0.637 and 0.027 between telomerase activity and serum IgG level, respectively, with a significance level of 5%. However, the relation between telomerase activity and other clinical data was not significant in the SLE group. Telomerase activity was measured before and after treatment and changes in the activity level were analysed.

Table 1

Telomerase activity and clinical laboratory parameters and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI)

SLEDAI decreased in all patients after treatment. Wilcoxon signed rank test with a significance level of 5% showed a significant decrease in telomerase activity (p=0.043) after treatment.

The treatment reduced the telomerase activity in peripheral mononuclear cells. We could not confirm whether the cause was due to the steroids or the reduction of disease activity. However, because the telomerase activity of peripheral mononuclear cells was correlated with SLEDAI, the peripheral blood telomerase activity may be useful in the evaluation of disease activity and in judging the therapeutic effects in SLE.

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