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Anti-U3 snRNP antibodies in localised scleroderma
  1. K YAMANE,
  2. H IHN,
  3. M KUBO,
  4. Y ASANO,
  5. N YAZAWA,
  6. K TAMAKI
  1. Department of Dermatology
  2. Faculty of Medicine
  3. University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  4. Division of Cellular Signalling
  5. Institute for Advanced Medical Research
  6. Keio University School of Medicine
  7. Tokyo, Japan
  1. IN-DER{at}h.u-tokyo.ac.jp
  1. M KUWANA
  1. Department of Dermatology
  2. Faculty of Medicine
  3. University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
  4. Division of Cellular Signalling
  5. Institute for Advanced Medical Research
  6. Keio University School of Medicine
  7. Tokyo, Japan
  1. IN-DER{at}h.u-tokyo.ac.jp

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Localised scleroderma (LScl) is a connective tissue disorder usually limited to the skin and subcutaneous tissue, but it sometimes affects the muscle beneath the cutaneous lesions. The absence of Raynaud's phenomenon, acrosclerosis, and internal organ involvement differentiates LScl from systemic sclerosis (SSc).1 LScl has been reported to be accompanied by a variety of abnormal immune reactions, such as the presence of antinuclear antibody, rheumatoid factor, anti-single-stranded DNA antibody (anti-ssDNA), and antihistone antibody.2-5

In our laboratory an indirect immunofluorescent study showed nucleolar staining in the serum samples of some patients with LScl. Although autoantibodies to nucleolar antigens have been well described in patients with SSc,6 7 these antibodies have not been determined in patients with LScl, and the incidence of anti-U3 snRNP antibodies has not been described previously. In this study we investigated the prevalence of anti-U3 snRNP antibodies using RNA immunoprecipitation,8 and examined the clinical and laboratory features of patients with LScl. In addition, we examined the serum samples of patients with SSc and control subjects matched for age and sex with the patients with LScl.

We found anti-U3 snRNP antibodies in 2/70 (3%) serum samples from the patients with LScl (fig 1). One of the 28 patients (4%) with linear scleroderma and one of the 20 patients (5%) with morphoea had anti-U3 snRNP antibodies (table 1). This prevalence was smaller than that in patients with SSc,9 but there was no significant difference. RNA immunoprecipitation using silver staining of the RNA is not as sensitive as other methods—for example, probing with a labelled U3 snRNP probe. Possibly, some anti-U3 snRNP positive serum samples might have been missed. The three patients with SSc and with anti-U3 snRNP antibodies were diagnosed as having diffuse cutaneous SSc, and they tended to be older and have disease of longer duration than patients with LScl; the difference was not significant. In this study the titres of antinucleolar antibodies in the two patients with LScl with anti-U3 snRNP antibodies were 1/320 and 1/640, respectively. The titres of this antibody did not change in a follow up study. A previous study reported that 43/46 patients with SSc and anti-U3 snRNP antibodies produced bright nucleolar staining with titres >1/640.10 Taken together, the titres of antinucleolar antibodies in patients with LScl were as high as those in SSc. Patients with LScl and with anti-U3 snRNP antibodies did not have sclerodactyly or nailfold bleeding. Raynaud's phenomenon did not occur at any time in the course of their disease. These results suggest that anti-U3 snRNP antibodies occur in patients with LScl as well as in those with SSc.

Figure 1

RNA immunoprecipitation. Urea (7 M/10% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of phenol-extracted immunoprecipitates from HeLa cell extracts were stained with silver. Total nucleic acids, with 7-2RNA, 8-2RNA, and the U snRNA regions are indicated. Serum samples used for immunoprecipitation included: lane 1, total RNA; lane 2, healthy control serum; lanes 3–4, patients with LScl and with anti-U3 snRNP antibodies; lane 5, patient with SSc and anti-Th/To ribonucleoprotein antibodies; lane 6, patient with SSc and anti-U3 snRNP antibodies; lane 7, patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and anti-Sm antibodies.

Table 1

Frequencies of antibodies to U3 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), detected by immunoprecipitation, in patients with localised scleroderma (LScl), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and control subjects

The patients with LScl and anti-U3 snRNP antibodies tended to be younger, have shorter disease duration, have fewer sclerotic lesions, and have fewer affected areas than those without, but there was no significant difference. We could not find any correlations with clinical manifestations, probably because of the small number of patients. In earlier investigations of systemic sclerosis, anti-U3 snRNP antibodies did not seem to have any distinctive clinical and laboratory correlation. A large group of patients with SSc was assembled and the clinical features of the patients with anti-U3 snRNP antibodies investigated; various clinical associations were reported.9 A large group of patients with LScl might similarly disclose clinical associations of patients with LScl with anti-U3 snRNP antibodies.

Previous studies have shown that anti-U3 snRNP antibodies rarely coexist with other autoantibodies.9 Okanoet al reported that each distinctive serum antibody is associated with its own unique combination of clinical features.9 In our study antihistone antibodies or anti-ssDNA did not coexist with anti-U3 snRNP antibodies, and no other autoantibodies were detected by RNA immunoprecipitation. LScl may be a heterogeneous condition with diverse autoantibodies, and these antibodies may have a mutually exclusive status.

In conclusion, we showed for the first time that anti-U3 snRNP antibodies are found in patients with LScl by RNA immunoprecipitation. We found no correlations between clinical and laboratory manifestations in the present study. Our study suggests that the presence of anti-U3 snRNP antibodies is one of the serological abnormalities in LScl. A study of more patients may assist in showing a distinctive association between anti-U3 snRNP antibodies and the clinical and laboratory features of patients with LScl.

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