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A “missed” cryoglobulin: the importance of in vitro calcium concentration
  1. MARC ANDRÉ,
  2. HAKIM MAHAMMEDI,
  3. OLIVIER AUMAITRE
  1. Department of Internal Medicine, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU of Clermont-Ferrand, BP 69, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1, France
  2. Laboratory of Immunology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, BP 38, 63001 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1, France
  3. Fondation Centre de Transfusion Sanguine (SRTS VD), 27 rue du Bugnon, CH-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland
  4. Department of Internal Medicine, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13, France
  1. Dr Aumaitre
  1. ARLETTE TRIDON
  1. Department of Internal Medicine, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU of Clermont-Ferrand, BP 69, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1, France
  2. Laboratory of Immunology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, BP 38, 63001 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1, France
  3. Fondation Centre de Transfusion Sanguine (SRTS VD), 27 rue du Bugnon, CH-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland
  4. Department of Internal Medicine, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13, France
  1. Dr Aumaitre
  1. JEAN-DANIEL TISSOT
  1. Department of Internal Medicine, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU of Clermont-Ferrand, BP 69, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1, France
  2. Laboratory of Immunology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, BP 38, 63001 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1, France
  3. Fondation Centre de Transfusion Sanguine (SRTS VD), 27 rue du Bugnon, CH-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland
  4. Department of Internal Medicine, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13, France
  1. Dr Aumaitre
  1. JEAN-CHARLES PIETTE
  1. Department of Internal Medicine, Gabriel Montpied Hospital, CHU of Clermont-Ferrand, BP 69, 63003 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1, France
  2. Laboratory of Immunology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, BP 38, 63001 Clermont-Ferrand Cedex 1, France
  3. Fondation Centre de Transfusion Sanguine (SRTS VD), 27 rue du Bugnon, CH-1005 Lausanne, Switzerland
  4. Department of Internal Medicine, Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, 75651 Paris Cedex 13, France
  1. Dr Aumaitre

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Cryoglobulins are immunoglobulins which precipitate at reduced temperature and that redissolve by warming the serum sample to 37 °C. Mixed cryoglobulinaemia may manifest clinically as skin, articular, renal, and peripheral nerve complications.1 To ensure optimal detection, blood samples must be obtained and preserved at 37 °C. We report on a patient whose clinical presentation was suggestive of cryoglobulinaemia. Because cryoglobulins had been either undetectable or found at very low levels for several years despite repeated careful blood sample examinations with conventional assays, we initially thought he had Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The recent use of a modified assay finally led us to diagnose mixed cryoglobulinaemia. Included below is a description of the method used for cryoglobulin detection, emphasising the importance of in vitro calcium concentration.

Case report

A 52 year old man with multiple lipoma had a 20 year history of polyarthralgias affecting elbows, wrists, hands, knees, and feet, a 10 year history of Raynaud's disease affecting the hands and feet, and a seven year history of palpable purpura. His sister had coeliac disease. In June 1996 he developed attacks of abdominal pain concomitantly with arthralgias and palpable purpura of both legs. Serum creatinine was 95 μmol/l. Gammaglobulins were low (4.2 g/l) on serum protein electrophoresis. Serum concentrations of immunoglobulins were 4.49 g/l for IgG (normal range 6.42–11.92), 1.84 g/l for IgM (normal range 0.52–1.47), and 2.51 g/l for IgA (normal range 1.05–3.36). Tests for rheumatoid factors, including the Rose-Waaler test (Sanofi Pasteur, Marnes La Coquette, France), were positive (table 1), but other serum autoantibodies remained negative, including antinuclear, anti-DNA, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Complement concentrations were notably down, both for C4 <0.06 g/l (normal range 0.10–0.40; Behring Dade, Deerfield, USA) and for CH50 (home method) 25% of the normal range (60–120%). C3c and C3PA were also decreased at respectively 0.34 g/l (normal range 0.60–1.10) and <0.04 g/l (normal range 0.10–0.40). A complete set of serum markers was negative for hepatitis B and C viruses. Cryoglobulin measurements were initially negative or inconclusive (table 1). Proteinuria was negative. Radiographs of the affected joints were normal. A computed tomographic scan of the abdomen showed a thickened aspect of the duodenal and jejunal loop wall. Skin biopsy was not performed. Prednisone treatment (30 mg/day) was started but, owing to poor response, plasmapheresis was carried out in March 1997; azathioprine (150 mg/day) and colchicine (2 mg/day) were then added and, finally, a marked clinical improvement was obtained. A new flare up occurred in August 1998, including 3 g daily proteinuria of recent onset. The urinary sediment contained 20 red cells per high power field. Renal biopsy showed endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis with glomerular crescents and capillary loop fibrinous thrombi (no glomerulus on the sample for immunofluorescence study). The patient temporarily improved with plasmapheresis and methylprednisolone pulses followed by high dose oral prednisone (60 mg/day). From September 1998 to January 1999, proteinuria increased to 5.4 g daily, and a high serum cryoglobulin concentration was then first detected with the assay described below (table 1). Azathioprine was replaced by monthly intravenous cyclophosphamide (1 g per infusion), associated with subsequent plasmapheresis in January and April 1999. Despite this treatment the patient's symptoms persisted and renal complications worsened, with a raised proteinuria at 6.28 g/day and a serum creatinine at 192 μmol/l in July 1999. A new evaluation was made. A bone marrow biopsy was normal. The skin biopsy showed leukocytoclastic vasculitis with slight deposits of IgM, IgA, and C3 on immunofluorescence study. Renal biopsy showed an endocapillary and extracapillary glomerulonephritis with glomerular crescents in a mean of 30% of glomeruli, and IgG, IgM, and C3 deposits on immunofluorescence study. Prednisone was continued and cyclophosphamide was given orally (150 mg/day). The patient's condition is stabilised at the present time.

Table 1

Evolution of cryoglobulinaemia, rheumatoid factor, and complement levels

A modified assay was developed to detect a possible cryoglobulin. Briefly, a serum sample was obtained and centrifuged at 37 °C, then stored at 4 °C for eight days. The precipitate was separated by centrifugation, then washed each day for three consecutive days with either cold phosphate buffered saline (PBS; conventional assay) or distilled water to enhance the protein solubility (current asssay). Indeed, we noted that some of the precipitate was lost in the PBS. Then, each precipitate was dissolved in a low volume of PBS for measurement of protein (Hartree assay adapted for cryoglobulins) and typed by Western blot (fig 1).2 Precipitates obtained by both methods were analysed with two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.3 4 In addition, some cryoprecipitate samples were passed at 37 °C over protein G-Sepharose columns. Proteins were then eluted using HCl-glycine, pH 2, and analysed with two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.3 The influence of calcium concentration on cryoglobulin solubility was investigated as follows. Solubility of the cryoglobulin obtained with distilled water was tested by adding Hanks's solution containing either Ca2+ (1.26 mM) and Mg2+ (0.80 mM), Ca2+ (1.26 mM) without Mg2+, or Mg2+ (0.80 mM) without Ca2+. The dissolved proteins were measured as described above. About 50% of the precipitate became soluble when Ca2+ was present in the milieu, contrasting with 5% solubility only when Ca2+ was absent.

Figure 1

Western blot of cryoglobulin. Pattern obtained with anti IgG, IgA, IgM, κ and λ chain labelled with alkaline phosphatase on cryoglobulins transferred onto nitrocellulose sheets: oligoclonal (top) and polyclonal pattern (middle) for cryoglobulin washed with conventional assay, type II pattern IgMκ (arrow) and polyclonal IgG, IgA, and IgM for cryoglobulin washed with current assay (bottom).

Our observation indicates that cryoglobulinaemia must remain highly suspected despite apparently negative laboratory results when clinical and biological data—namely, low C4 associated with positive rheumatoid factors—are consistent with, or even more suggestive of this diagnosis. Indeed, monoclonal or polyclonal rheumatoid factors are nearly always part of mixed cryoglobulins, where they bind to immune complexes—principally antigen complexed IgG—that subsequently precipitate.5-8 Nevertheless, when using conventional assay, cryoglobulin remained negative or weakly positive in our patient. Interestingly, a monoclonal IgMκ was sometimes found on immunofixation analysis. In November 1998 the occurrence of a glomerulonephritis consistent with cryoglobulin related kidney complications prompted us to perform further tests for cryoglobulins, including the method described above. Then, a high titre type II cryoglobulin (>1000 μg/ml) was isolated, and subsequently shown to consist of monoclonal IgMκ and polyclonal IgG, the former being thought to support the previously detected rheumatoid factor activity. Two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis confirmed the presence of polyclonal IgG and monoclonal IgM in the cryoprecipitate, and allowed identification of an additional monoclonal IgA. Finally, electrophoretic studies of the proteins eluted from protein G columns showed the presence of polyclonal IgG, with only traces of the monoclonal IgMκ, indicating that the complex dissociated at 37 °C.

This cryoglobulin has unusual properties because it became soluble in PBS, while it precipitated in serum, distilled water, or calcium buffers. Usually, cryoprecipitation is a two step process.5 7-10 Firstly, rheumatoid factors bind to immune complexes at reduced temperature because of a cold enhanced affinity. Secondly, the large immune complexes precipitate. This requires favourable physicochemical conditions, including suitable pH and ionic strength of the solvent. Usually, the precipitate is stable in saline. Our data suggest that calcium concentration may be crucial for cryoglobulin precipitation, as in the case reported by Qiet al.10 This property might account for some of the discrepancies observed between the conventional and the current assay. It might also explain the severity of the symptoms in vivo . Further investigation is needed to approach the other determinant factors of precipitation. Hypocryoglobulins display a quite different property in the way they are isolated from hypotonic serum, though they lead to the same clinical syndrome.11

To conclude, patients with clinical and biological manifestations suggestive of cryoglobulins constitute a pitfall for clinicians and biologists when standard laboratory investigations remain negative for cryoglobulinaemia. Unusual in vitro properties of cryoglobulins, including dependence upon calcium concentration, should be looked for in such circumstances.

Acknowledgments

We thank Ray Langford for reviewing the English manuscript.

References

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